The Blogosphere Hearts Joe Morris

October 29, 2009

Excerpts from recent blog reviews of the Joe Morris Quartet’s Today On Earth (AUM Fidelity):

“The music, performed by Morris (guitar), Jim Hobbs (alto saxophone), Timo Shanko (bass) and Luther Gray (drums), holds up quite impressively under repeated listenings. The tracks are fairly long (4 over 10 minutes and only 1 under 7), but several of them move so gracefully (‘Observer’, ‘Ashes’) it’s easy to get lost in the sonic world the quartet creates. It’s been over 3 decades since Joe Morris first came to critical notice and he continues to grow as a composer and musician, creating challenging music for open minds.”
Richard Kamins, Hartford Courant’s See! Hear!

“Joe Morris is having one of them crazy years. Nothing can seem to stop him, as he is releasing one CD after another. The latest—and best!—one is this studio session with his quartet. One of the best jazz albums of 2009.”
François Couture, Monsieur Delire

“Four of the seven tracks on Today On Earth clock in at 10 or 11 minutes, and all of that time is well spent. Of his recent releases, this album is one of the best place to start (behind the Flow Trio), since its places his adventurous improvisational chops in a setting that makes them stand out even more.”
Mike Shanley, shanleyonmusic

“…the main strength of the album is the truly wonderful compositions, which are refined, carefully structured, compelling and beautifully performed…here [Morris’] playing is much closer to the traditional jazz guitar, and I must say, it suits him well. And the band is absolutely stunning, in its pretenseless, unassuming playing, yet delivering a rare level of combined accuracy of tone and interaction, giving space, dialoguing well, giving the right emphasis at the right time, and adding loads of emotional depth: truly great. But as said, the real treat are the compositions, with themes like ‘Animal’ or ‘Observer’ that will keep ringing in your head long after you’ve stopped listening to the music.”
Stef Gijssels, Free Jazz


More Reviews For KLANG’s Tea Music

August 20, 2009

Tea Music (Allos Documents), the studio debut from the Chicago-based quartet, KLANG, continues to collect positive reviews leading up to its August 25th release.

The group, led by clarinetist/composer James Falzone, features vibraphonist Jason Adasiewicz, bassist Jason Roebke and drummer Tim Daisy.

Together Falzone and Adasiewicz form a dynamic front-line, recalling the ebullience of Goodman and Hampton, the introspection of Jimmy Giuffre and Paul Bley, and Eric Dolphy and Bobby Hutcherson’s spiky interplay.
A limber rhythm section, Roebke and Daisy drive the ensemble with quicksilver shifts in mood and tone. Brisk and economical, they underscore the delicate tonality of Falzone’s woody clarinet and Adasiewicz’s shimmering, metallic vibes with supple nuance and elastic timing. An adventurous yet accessible effort from the Windy City’s finest young improvisers, Tea Music is another compelling album in a long line of stellar releases documenting the new Chicago scene.

“Together Falzone and Adasiewicz form a dynamic front-line,” writes AllAboutJazz.com’s Troy Collins, “recalling the ebullience of Goodman and Hampton, the introspection of Jimmy Giuffre and Paul Bley, and Eric Dolphy and Bobby Hutcherson’s spiky interplay. A limber rhythm section, Roebke and Daisy drive the ensemble with quicksilver shifts in mood and tone…they underscore the delicate tonality of Falzone’s woody clarinet and Adasiewicz’s shimmering, metallic vibes with supple nuance and elastic timing.”

Dusted‘s Marc Medwin adds, “The musicianship itself is first-rate, the group able to stop on a dime throughout. The players’ performances blend to give the band a unique voice, one rooted in swing and cool but cognizant of all events transpiring since.”

Finally, in a post on his blog, Monsieur Délire, earlier this week, François Couture declared, “Oh, what a nice jazz record, possibly the best jazz CD I’ve heard this year. Clarinetist James Falzone had seduced me in 2006 with his The Sign and the Thing Signified. This album by his quartet KLANG hits me right on the pleasure bone again.”